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list of corporations Britannica

Details: Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. Apple Inc. Armco Inc. Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company. Atlantic Richfield Company. B.F. Goodrich Company. Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Bank of America Corporation. The Bank of New York Company, Inc. …

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company military unit Britannica

Details: Companies in modern armies vary widely in size and equipment, usually being built around a function or mission (e.g., signal repair, medical ambulance, engineer bridge, reconnaissance, or military police companies) or around a weapon or class of weapons (e.g., tank, rifle or infantry, or mortar companies).

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business organization

Details: business organization - business organization - Management and control of companies: The simplest form of management is the partnership. In Anglo-American common-law and European civil-law countries, every partner (other than a limited partner) is entitled to take part in the management of the firm’s business; however, a partnership agreement may provide that …

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Hewlett-Packard Company History & Facts Britannica

Details: Hewlett-Packard Company, American manufacturer of software and computer services that was founded in 1939. The company split in 2015 into two companies: HP Incorporated and Hewlett Packard Enterprise. Headquarters were in Palo Alto, California.

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corporation Definition, History, & Facts Britannica

Details: Corporation, specific legal form of organization of persons and material resources, chartered by the state, for the purpose of conducting business. Its features include limited liability and juridical personality, which means that the corporation itself as a fictive ‘person’ may sue and be sued and may make contracts.

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Local Enterprise Company British government agency

Details: Other articles where Local Enterprise Company is discussed: employee training: …Wales and also of 22 Local Enterprise Companies in Scotland. These independent companies, operated by private business leaders, manage a variety of job-training …

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East India Company Definition, History, & Facts Britannica

Details: East India Company, English company formed in 1600 for the exploitation of trade with East and Southeast Asia and India. Starting as a monopolistic trading body, the company became involved in politics and acted as an agent of British imperialism in India from the early 18th century to the mid-19th century.

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space tourism Companies, History, & Facts Britannica

Details: Space tourism, recreational space travel, either on established government-owned vehicles such as the Russian Soyuz and the International Space Station (ISS) or on vehicles fielded by private companies. Space tourism has gained new prominence as more opportunities have become available.

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information system Definition, Examples, & Facts

Details: Information system, an integrated set of components for collecting, storing, and processing data and for providing information and digital products. Many major companies are built entirely around information systems. Learn more about information systems in this article.

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online gaming History, Examples, Companies, & Facts

Details: Game companies funded dozens of private counseling centres for addicted gamers in an effort to forestall legislation, such as that passed by China in 2005, that would force designers to impose in-game penalties for players who …

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Tech Companies Britannica

Details: Tech Companies Question: This company acquired the mobile phone maker Motorola Mobility in 2012. Answer: Google has grown large since its origins as a search engine founded in 1998 by Sergey Brin and Larry Page.

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industry Definition, Sectors, & Facts Britannica

Details: Industry, group of productive enterprises or organizations that produce or supply goods, services, or sources of income. In economics, industries are generally classified as primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary; secondary industries are further classified as heavy and light.

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livery company trade association Britannica

Details: The companies vary a great deal in detail, and the range of their wealth and influence is wide. Nearly every one of the companies once controlled the craft or trade indicated by its name; most were concerned with skilled crafts such as the Goldsmiths and the Carpenters, while several dealt with victualing trades, as, for example, the Bakers and

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National Association of Software and Services Companies

Details: National Association of Software and Services Companies (NASSCOM), trade association of Indian information technology (IT) and computer software and services companies, established in 1988. NASSCOM’s membership also includes Indian branch offices of foreign companies. It is headquartered in New

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Chevron Corporation American corporation Britannica

Details: Chevron Corporation, U.S. petroleum corporation that was founded through the 1906 merger of Pacific Oil Company and Standard Oil Company of Iowa. One of the largest oil companies in the world, it acquired Gulf Oil Corporation in 1984, Texaco Inc. …

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automotive industry History, Overview, Definition

Details: Automotive industry, all those companies and activities involved in the manufacture of motor vehicles, including most components, such as engines and bodies, but excluding tires, batteries, and fuel. The industry’s principal products are passenger automobiles and light trucks.

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mercantilism Definition & Examples Britannica

Details: Mercantilism led to the creation of monopolistic trading companies, such as the East India Company and the French East India Company. Restrictions on where finished goods could be purchased led in many cases to burdensome high prices for those goods. Commercial rivalry tended to result in military rivalry as well, notably during the Anglo-Dutch

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Tata Group History, Companies, Subsidiaries, & Facts

Details: Tata Group, privately owned conglomerate of nearly 100 companies encompassing several primary business sectors: chemicals, consumer products, energy, engineering, information systems, materials, and services.Headquarters are in Mumbai.. The Tata Group was founded as a private trading firm in 1868 by entrepreneur and philanthropist …

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finance company financial institution Britannica

Details: Many companies in both Europe and the United States continue to specialize in financing purchases of particular commodities and remain closely associated with specific manufacturers. Some also extend credit for wholesale purchases by retail dealers. Consumer finance or small-loan companies also arose in the 1900s. Until then the need for

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divestment Definition, Business, & Examples Britannica

Details: divestment, also called divestiture, the disposal of assets in any of a variety of ways, usually for ethical, financial, or political reasons.At the institutional level, divestment is a policy and set of economic sanctions used by corporations, groups of shareholders, individuals, and governments to put pressure on a company or a country, usually to protest either the company’s or the

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pharmaceutical industry Britannica

Details: pharmaceutical industry, the discovery, development, and manufacture of drugs and medications (pharmaceuticals) by public and private organizations. The modern era of the pharmaceutical industry—of isolation and purification of compounds, chemical synthesis, and computer-aided drug design—is

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market economics Britannica

Details: market, a means by which the exchange of goods and services takes place as a result of buyers and sellers being in contact with one another, either directly or through mediating agents or institutions. Markets in the most literal and immediate sense are …

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Monsanto History, Products, Acquisition, & Facts

Details: Monsanto, in full Monsanto Company, formerly (1933–64) Monsanto Chemical Company and (1901–33) Monsanto Chemical Works, American corporation that was a leading producer of chemical, agricultural, and biochemical products.After being acquired by Bayer in 2018, it ceased to exist as an entity.. The Monsanto Chemical Works was founded in 1901 by John F. Queeny …

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ballet History, Dancers, Choreographers, Companies

Details: Ballet, theatrical dance in which a formal academic dance technique—the danse d’ecole—is combined with other artistic elements such as music, costume, and stage scenery. The academic technique itself is also known as ballet. Learn more about the history of ballet in this article.

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Yahoo! History, Sale, & Facts Britannica

Details: Yahoo!, in full Yahoo! Inc., global Internet services provider based in Sunnyvale, California, and owned by Verizon Communications since 2017. It was founded in 1994 by Jerry Yang and David Filo, graduate students at Stanford University in California. Yahoo! provides users with online utilities, information, and access to other Web sites.

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artificial intelligence Definition, Examples, Types

Details: Artificial intelligence, the ability of a computer or computer-controlled robot to perform tasks commonly associated with intelligent beings. The term is frequently applied to the project of developing systems with the ability to reason, discover meaning, generalize, or learn from past experiences.

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Mitsui Group Japanese business consortium Britannica

Details: The Mitsui group comprises several dozen companies, including cement, petrochemicals, commerce, construction, energy, engineering, finance and insurance, food, machinery, mining, nonferrous metals, real estate, and shipping industries. All of the major firms are large multinational corporations that are based in Tokyo or Ōsaka and have offices and subsidiaries …

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BAE Systems British company Britannica

Details: The heritage companies of BAC and Hawker Siddeley were responsible for many innovative and successful aircraft. Bristol, A.V. Roe, Gloster, and De Havilland each had hallmark airplanes in World War I; Bristol produced the F.2b fighter, which became one of the most successful British and Canadian military aircraft.In the World War II era notable products from this group …

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United Technologies Corporation American corporation

Details: United Technologies Corporation (UTC), American multi-industry company with significant business concentrations in aerospace products and services, including jet engines. Formed in 1934 as United Aircraft Corporation, it adopted its present name in 1975. Headquarters are in Hartford, Connecticut.

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fashion industry

Details: Companies that do not sell their own products at retail must place those products at wholesale prices in the hands of retailers, such as boutiques, department stores, and online sales companies. They use fashion shows, catalogs, and a sales force armed with sample products to find a close fit between the manufacturer’s products and the

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aerospace industry

Details: In 1978 more than 100 American companies produced some 17,800 piston-engine and turboprop general aviation aircraft. Due to judicial interpretation of U.S. product liability laws in a landmark case that year, manufacturers were put in legal jeopardy even for pilot-caused and weather-induced problems

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merger business Britannica

Details: Companies often grow by combining with other companies. One company may purchase all or part of another; two companies may merge by exchanging shares; or a wholly new company may be formed through consolidation of the old companies. From the …

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Mitsubishi Group Japanese business consortium Britannica

Details: Mitsubishi Group, loose consortium of independent Japanese companies that were created out of the giant, family-owned Mitsubishi business combine, or zaibatsu, which was broken up after World War II and reestablished in April 1950.. The first of the Mitsubishi companies was a trading and shipping concern, Mitsubishi Commercial Company (Mitsubishi Shōkai), formed in 1873 …

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automotive industry

Details: automotive industry - automotive industry - Growth in Europe: The period from 1919 to 1939 also brought significant growth in automobile manufacturing in Europe, though on a considerably smaller scale than in the United States. The European industry was moving in the same directions as the American industry, toward a mass market for motor vehicles, but it made slower …

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9 of the Biggest Oil Spills in History Britannica

Details: A fire aboard the oil tanker Castillo de Bellver in August 1983 was responsible for the tanker’s capsizing. When the fire broke out on August 6, the Castillo de Bellver was located in the South Atlantic Ocean roughly 70 miles from Cape Town, South Africa.The tanker drifted and broke into two pieces; its stern section, which contained some 110,000 tons of oil, drifted to within 24 …

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Facebook Overview, History, & Facts Britannica

Details: Facebook, American online social network service that is part of the company Meta Platforms. Facebook was founded in 2004 by Mark Zuckerberg, Eduardo Saverin, Dustin Moskovitz, and Chris Hughes, all students at Harvard University. It became the largest social network in the world.

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fashion industry

Details: Some companies use their own production facilities for some or all of the manufacturing process, but most rely on separately owned manufacturing firms or contractors to produce garments to the fashion company’s specifications. In the field of women’s apparel, manufacturers typically produce several product lines (collections) a year, which

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Ford Motor Company History, Headquarters, & Facts

Details: Ford Motor Company, American automotive corporation cofounded in 1903 by Henry Ford. One of the world’s largest automakers, it manufactures passenger cars, trucks, and tractors as well as automotive parts and accessories. Learn more about Ford’s history and vehicles.

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Sumitomo Group Japanese business consortium Britannica

Details: Sumitomo Group, a keiretsu (consortium) of independent Japanese companies that were created out of the giant, family-owned Sumitomo zaibatsu (business combine), which was broken up after World War II. The zaibatsu had grown out of the House of Sumitomo (Sumitomo-ke), one of the major Japanese merchant houses of the Tokugawa period (1603–1867).

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